If your company is getting aboard the telecommuting trend, consider the following four keys to success:

1. Set a trial period. Begin with a two- to six-month period during which the employee and his or her manager can get a feel for just how (and whether) this arrangement will work. If either side is unhappy at the end of the trial period, make adjustments or scrap the idea entirely.

2. Manage for results. Generally, telecommuters should be managed based on results — not on close scrutiny of everyday work methods. That said, instruct managers to schedule regular telephone calls and request status reports (as necessary) to stay in the loop.

3. Don’t forget about them. Just because they work remotely doesn’t mean they’re no longer part of the team. Include telecommuters in companywide e-mail announcements and invite them to meetings or events held at the office — even if you think they won’t be able to attend.

4. Provide quality technology. Telecommuters should have a reliable computer, Internet connection, telephone (with voice mail), and all the necessary software and network connections. This may seem obvious, but many people launch into telecommuting without considering the nuts and bolts of doing so.

Telecommuting arrangements can also save your company money, such as on office space. 

© 2016

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