Retirement plan contribution limits are indexed for inflation, but with inflation remaining low, most of the limits remain unchanged for 2017. The only limit that has increased from the 2016 level is for contributions to defined contribution plans, which has gone up by $1,000.

Type of limit
2017 limit
Elective deferrals to 401(k), 403(b), 457(b)(2) and 457(c)(1) plans
$18,000
Contributions to defined contribution plans
$54,000
Contributions to SIMPLEs
$12,500
Contributions to IRAs
$5,500
Catch-up contributions to 401(k), 403(b), 457(b)(2) and 457(c)(1) plans
$6,000
Catch-up contributions to SIMPLEs
$3,000
Catch-up contributions to IRAs
$1,000

Nevertheless, if you’re not already maxing out your contributions, you still have an opportunity to save more in 2017. And if you turn age 50 in 2017, you can begin to take advantage of catch-up contributions.

However, keep in mind that additional factors may affect how much you’re allowed to contribute (or how much your employer can contribute on your behalf). For example, income-based limits may reduce or eliminate your ability to make Roth IRA contributions or to make deductible traditional IRA contributions. If you have questions about how much you can contribute to tax-advantaged retirement plans in 2017, check with us.

© 2016

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